News & Suggestions

Overcoming Fatigue as a Parent of a Special Needs Child

Overall, according to Pew Research Center, 14 percent of students in the United States participate in a special education program. If you’re the parent of a special needs child, you’ve likely experienced your fair share of fatigue along the way.

While it is mainly normal to feel tired or frustrated on occasion, it’s possible to combat fatigue by using the right approach.

44TH Annual Belle Blackwell School Nurse Conference

As a registered Vendor with Aldine, Cy-Fairs, Klein, Magnolia, Spring, Tomball, and Waller ISDs, it is our honor to be a sponsor at the Texas School Nurses Organization (TSNO) Region 4 44TH Annual Belle Blackwell School Nurse Conference. Funtastic Learning Toys will have an exhibit table displaying Special Needs products offered in our store and may be useful by school nurses.

Tips to Create a Great Bedroom for a Child with ASD

Children on the autism spectrum flourish under different circumstances than their peers. This is why it is important for parents to create a bedroom environment that encourages them to do so while making them feel safe, comfortable, and happy. The changes don’t have to be huge or difficult to implement: all that it takes is a bit of extra thought and consideration

Funtastic Learning Toys Sponsors Workshop at the 2022 Education Explosion Conference

Building Equity in the Classroom Through Language and Culture Sharon L Schuett, PresidentFuntastic Learning Toys Funtastic Learning Toys will be providing products discussed in a lecture and workshop for “Building Equity in the Classroom Through Language and Culture”. Product information, review, and demonstration available at our booth for conference attendees not attending lecture or workshop.Read more ⟶

Encourage a Child with a Learning Disability to Get Involved with the Arts

Statistics indicate that one in five kids in the US has a learning disability, which can result in falling behind in school, disciplinary issues, and low self-esteem. Whether a child has an issue with reading, writing, speaking, listening, reasoning, or solving math problems, these disabilities don’t mean they’re not bright.